Month: April 2019

head in the sand

If you have your head in the sand, you’re refusing to confront or acknowledge a problem, or ignoring unwanted news or events in the hope that they will go away. This arises from the myth that ostriches hide their heads in the sand when faced with anĀ attack by predators. The idea was apparently first recorded by the Roman writer, Pliny…

cut to the quick

“Cut to the quick” means to injure deeply or to wound, especially emotionally. The Morris Dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins says, “Historically, both the noun ‘quick’ and the adjective and adverb forms come from the same root, the Anglo-Saxon ‘cwicu,’ meaning ‘alive or living.’” Literary examples date back at least to the early 1500s, in works by Shakespeare, Dryden,…