Month: April 2019

screwed, blued, and tattooed

Thoroughly cheated and victimized. Or else enjoying the perfect shore leave. “Stewed” is sometimes added for further effect. (Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English by Partridge)¬† Adding “and sold down the river” also means “very drunk.” Since the phrase could mean being completely put through some process, it may originally have referred to the process of becoming a full-fledged sailor.…

hat trick

A hat trick is the achievement of a goal or other positive feat three times in a sport or other game, such as car racing, marbles, poker, and scrabble. To score a hat trick of hat tricks means to score three goals in each of three consecutive games. The term “hat trick” may have been influenced by or adopted from…

can’t make heads nor tails of

If you can’t “make heads or tails” of something, it means you’re confused and can’t figure out what to do. The phrase may have been born in Ancient Rome, in a phrase used by Cicero, (106 to 43 BCE), ne caput nec pedes, which means “neither head nor feet.” In other words, you can’t tell which end is which. Sometimes…

head in the sand

If you have your head in the sand, you’re refusing to confront or acknowledge a problem, or ignoring unwanted news or events in the hope that they will go away. This arises from the myth that ostriches hide their heads in the sand when faced with an¬†attack by predators. The idea was apparently first recorded by the Roman writer, Pliny…

cut to the quick

“Cut to the quick” means to injure deeply or to wound, especially emotionally. The Morris Dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins says, “Historically, both the noun ‘quick’ and the adjective and adverb forms come from the same root, the Anglo-Saxon ‘cwicu,’ meaning ‘alive or living.’” Literary examples date back at least to the early 1500s, in works by Shakespeare, Dryden,…