a good egg

“A good egg” is an old-fashioned term for a good guy or a kind person. The expression originally came from its opposite, “bad egg,” British public school slang from the 1800s for someone who was not nice. Fifty years later, “good egg” began to be used for a good person. Literally, of course, a good egg is one that is…

in a nutshell

“In a nutshell” is an idiom which describes summing something up in a concise way, or “in a few words.” For example, “Just give me the facts in a nutshell.”  Shakespeare’s Hamlet used it when he said, “I could be bounded in a nutshell, and count myself a king of infinite space, were it not that I have bad dreams.”…

Freebies

As of today, all my books at smashwords.com are permanently free! Why? Because that’s what I feel like doing to begin the celebrations for the upcoming summer solstice. So take advantage!  

scissors

Scissors are hand-operated shearing tools, used for cutting cloth, paper, string, and other thin material. Many varieties exist. A pair of scissors consists of a pair of metal blades pivoted so that the sharpened edges slide against each other when the handles are closed. Modern scissors are often designed ergonomically with composite thermoplastic and rubber handles which enable the user…

green-eyed monster

green-eyed monster The “green-eyed monster” is jealousy or jealousy personified. It may have been Shakespeare who coined the phrase and used it in The Merchant of Venice, in 1596. The phrase could have arisen from the idea that when people are sick, their skin turns a yellow or greenish color. Also, unripe fruit (which will make you sick when you…

loophole

Loophole has several definitions: —an arrow slit in a castle wall, a narrow vertical window to shoot from —a technicality that allows escape from a contract or commitment —a method of escape, especially an ambiguity or exception in a rule —an ambiguity or inadequacy in a system, which can be used to circumvent it In the 1300s, an English castle…

better than a slap in the face with a cold fish

This phrase has a lot of variations, for example: “better than a slap in the belly with a cold fish,” “better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick,” and “better than a smack in the eye with a wet kipper.” There are many more. Phrases such as these are used to mean that although the situation is…